Foods that sound better taste better

Another oldie but goodie.  This one on what influences our enjoyment of Pringles. Sound bites - Foods that sound better taste better The pleasure we derive from eating obviously depends on what food tastes and smells like. Visual presentation and colour are also important, as is the feel of the food in the mouth (i.e., its temperature and … [Read more...]

Oldies but goodies

It's summer time in the northern hemisphere and we thought it would be a good idea to look back over the years and post some crackers.  This one is particularly apt for you folks currently in a heat wave. Don't drink in the dark Mosquitoes, or mozzies as we would call them here in Australia, come out at night. I know this in part because I have … [Read more...]

The Language of Pain

It has long been one of my Sunday morning routines to read the Sunday New York times. In the July 12 edition of the “The Times” Joanna Burke offers an interesting commentary that caught my attention, “How To Talk About Pain”. There are several, as David Butler would say, “ nuggets” contained in here that provide insight into value and … [Read more...]

Chronic Pain: Lost Inhibition? PART TWO

In our last blog (Chronic Pain: Lost Inhibition?) we talked about the role of the thalamus in the development and maintenance of orofacial neuropathic pain. We reported that painful trigeminal neuropathic pain (PTN) is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, function and biochemistry, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in … [Read more...]

Enjoy a surf?

Swan neck

Margaret River in Western Australia has some of the best surfing in the world…great food and wine too…but that’s not all. There’s a bit of digital technology wave-riding happening over west too, with 2 new initiatives recently launched and freely available not matter where you live. painHEALTH:  aimed at helping people with persistent … [Read more...]

Can diagnostic uncertainty bias patients’ memory?

Danijela Serbic

Our thoughts shape our emotional and behavioural responses. This is a well-established principle in psychological research and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. We use preconceptions – known as “schemas” - to help us filter new and ambiguous information. These schemas are helpful in many ways, but they do not always serve us well: they will often … [Read more...]

Did you expect anything different?

Asking your patient what they expect is the thing to do these days, the idea being that what they expect is likely to influence how they will end up. The past years have seen an explosion of research into patient expectations, most of this research either looks at the link between patients’ expectations and their outcome, or has been performed in … [Read more...]

But they walked, hopped and jumped on it!

From the days of my infancy as a physiotherapist, I was raised on the teaching that pain should be measured by subjective means only. You have to ask the patient. You cannot presume to judge the magnitude of their experience: you ask them, and they tell you. If they say it’s a 2 out of 10, that’s what it is. If they say it’s an 11 out of 10 (I see … [Read more...]

Weather Does Not Affect Back Pain

Everyone has a story about their back pain and one story you often hear is that the weather makes the person’s back pain worse. Topical now in Sydney as it is quite cold. We had an open mind on the issue because we had heard the story so many times but we also know that as a research question it was wide open as no-one had rigorously evaluated this … [Read more...]

Stopping ectopic activity at the DRG: Revolution in phantom limb pain or another red herring?

We were very fortunate to have Prof Srinivasa Raja and A/Prof Matthias Ringkamp write a post for us on the high profile papers that just came out in PAIN, both relevant to the ongoing debate of peripheral vs central mechanisms of neuropathic pain. In case you are not in the know, these guys are big wigs in the neuropathic pain scene and it is great … [Read more...]