World Congress on Pain comes to you. 5: Innovative Approaches to Pain Education

Dr Eloise Carr (University of Calgary), Chair of the IASP Pain Education SIG coordinated the session “Innovative Approaches to Pain Education”. The goal of this session was to provide an update of the challenges and ongoing efforts of improving the consistency and accuracy of pain education in medical programs worldwide. Dr Carr, Dr Briggs, Dr … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 4: Learning Pain pt 2

Have a quick skim of the last blog post: this one follows on, as Part 2 of our synopsis of Professor Johan Vlaeyen’s plenary lecture at the World Congress on Pain... Having explained non-associative learning and Pavlovian conditioning, Prof Vlaeyen moved on to operant conditioning, a behavioural model of learning which Skinner proposed and … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 3: Learning Pain pt 1

Professor Johan Vlaeyen delivered his plenary lecture at the World Congress on Pain over video. The IASP promised to provide the recording on their website, but some of you had already asked for blog posts on the congress sessions, so I will provide a synopsis of Prof Vlaeyen’s lecture here. His talk was a helpful exploration of the roles that … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 2: Yoga, Mice, Pain and your Brain

Sarah Haag Yoga

The official title of the John J. Bonica Distinguished Lecture at the World Congress on Pain was actually ‘Effect of Environment on the Long-Term Consequences of Chronic Pain'. Prof Catherine Bushnell started her talk by noting comorbidities that any practicing clinician will have noticed at some point if treating people who are dealing with any … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 1: Disentangling CRPS

Adios Buenos Aires, IASP World Congress is always such a big beast. Vast conference halls, so many possible sessions to attend, so many posters to view and in this case so many fantastic Argentinian steaks to eat and wash down with equally fantastic Malbec. But you often leave trying to make sense of what you have heard and what, if anything, … [Read more...]

What underlies fear for movement in people with low back pain?

Sam Bunzli

“I would never bend over to pick something up. I try to brace myself on any move. Because every time time it hurts I think that I’m doing more damage. Every time it hurts I think it is getting worse and I am breaking down, I am killing myself…” (John, a 42 year old school teacher who has experienced back pain for 2 years). “I don't think that … [Read more...]

Pain communication through body posture: The many postures of pain

Joe Walsh

Pain is not just a sensory experience. Of course, there is a key biological element to pain, but there is also a much broader range of factors that may influence how we perceive threatening events and noxious stimuli and may feed into the pain experience. An important factor that influences our pain perception is the social context in which we … [Read more...]

Pain and mortality in older adults, what is the relationship?

Rachael Docking

In those of working age there is a known association between pain and increased risk of mortality (excess mortality) for both men and women. Macfarlane et al (2001) found that adults with regional/widespread pain were at increased risk of mortality in the 8 years following onset, and these deaths were predominantly due to external causes (such as … [Read more...]

Can’t reduce your pain? Try a different way!

Hadas Nahman

Our nervous system has the capability to reduce pain by activation of specific pathways that exert inhibitory effects on the messages entering the central nervous system during or after threat or damage to the body. This is called endogenous analgesia. Several paradigms can be used to test its capacity and evaluate its efficiency. One paradigm, … [Read more...]

What does tDCS do for pain?

Arne May

We’ve heard a lot about non-invasive electrical brain stimulation recently (e.g. Body in Mind blog post tDCS – negotiating the 'rising tide' of hype), but does it really work for chronic pain? Well, some people who conducted trials in chronic pain populations claim it does [e.g. 1–5], but taking a closer look at the evidence is disappointing: the … [Read more...]