Exercise for chronic whiplash – the road to Nullville.

It seems like only yesterday I was blogging about an important trial of targeted care for acute whiplash, which like other such trials returned a convincingly negative result. It seems that our best efforts at improving outcomes in the early stages after whiplash injury do not achieve their goals. But what about when we intervene with a group of … [Read more...]

PainAdelaide 2014 – Wrapping-up and looking forward

Wrap-up Thanks so much for being a part of possibly (probably!) the best little pain meeting in the world - PainAdelaide 2014.  We thought it was a roaring success and a large part of that is because of the feel in the room, to which you clearly contributed!  Our overseas visitors were very impressed with the meeting. They commented on the … [Read more...]

Emerging research trends on the relationship between sleep and pain

The relationship between pain and sleep quality is well reported in the literature. Sleep complaints are present in up to 88% of chronic pain disorders [1] and at least 50% of patients presenting with insomnia also suffer chronic pain [2]. This short blog post focusses on a recent review by Finan, Goodin and Smith (2013) who aimed to identify … [Read more...]

Dying values? Does pain matter?

Many established values of palliative care practice (like symptom relief, truth-telling, alleviation of suffering) are based on research done outside of Africa, yet African patients may have different values when it comes to death and dying.  A group of South African researchers sought to find out what processes Xhosa people (a 7.9 million-strong … [Read more...]

Could pain science be becoming fashionable? WCPT announces successful symposia.

The World Congress on Physical Therapy, which will be held in Singapore next May, has just announced the successful proposals for symposia. There were, apparently, a very large number of submissions. However, an intriguing thing has happened - 20% of symposiums are focussed on pain. At first glance, one might think - only 20%? However, if that is … [Read more...]

Spinal manipulative therapy: a slow death by data?

Neil O'Connell 2

I am a recovering manual therapist. In my physio career I have moved from freshly qualified apprentice, eager to learn the secrets of what was sold as a powerful tool, particularly for spinal pain, via what might be classed as a skilled practitioner, certainly in terms of courses attended and assessment hoops jumped through, to someone who now … [Read more...]

It is not just the brain that changes itself – time to embrace bioplasticity?

My mate Dr Mick Thacker, has long been teasing me for being neurocentric. In fact - for being A neurocentric. That is, he attaches this neurocentricity to me not just as a characteristic, but as an identity. Moving on from positions of prejudice first requires understanding and I have slowly come to understand that pain is not an emergent property … [Read more...]

Everything you wanted to know about CENTRAL SENSITISATION

BiM review of a J Pain paper by Alban Latremoliere and Clifford J. Woolf (AKA L&W) By Kerwin Talbot & Lorimer Moseley Another of our series on the Journal of Pain’s most downloaded articles – this one on central sensitisation. There is no doubt that central sensitisation has such a prominent role in our pain lexicon that it almost … [Read more...]

BiM in Review 2013

Here we are again - summer time on top of the world and with the mercury due to top 44C this week, we are well and truly gearing up for scorching days and balmy nights, beach cricket, home-made lemonade and plenty of bubbles. We will be on what I call ‘skeleton presence’ from Christmas Eve until late January. So, as is customary here at BiM, let’s … [Read more...]

Illusory Perceptions

Postman Pat

A person, let’s say his name is Pat, views a staircase in front of him; he is delivering a parcel (Postman Pat) and must climb three flights of stairs to deliver it to flat 15. Pat has knee pain and stairs aggravate his pain. Just as Pat is surveying the stairs, a (pain-free) resident sidles passed him and makes his way up; Pat follows behind him. … [Read more...]