The Ride4Pain, PainAdelaide, Australian Pain Society, Placebo Dinner, PhysioPain Network, Explain Pain3…..that empty feeling.

People round here are getting spoilt with the smorgasbord of exciting pain-related events that are going on at the moment. We kicked it off last November with the Ride for Pain – a few hundred people riding for 2, 4, or 6 hours, taking on their personal pain challenge. The tough nuts covered 100km and climbed 2600m, before rolling to the village … [Read more...]

What to call the amplification of nociceptive signals in the CNS that contribute to widespread pain?

Tory Madden

Clifford Woolf, who some may know as the ‘father of central sensitisation’, recently wrote a commentary to PAIN.[1] It piqued our interest because it was about the use of the term ‘central sensitisation’, and we suspect we know people who’d insist that the term ‘central sensitisation’ should only be used to describe changes at the dorsal horn, and … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 4: Learning Pain pt 2

Have a quick skim of the last blog post: this one follows on, as Part 2 of our synopsis of Professor Johan Vlaeyen’s plenary lecture at the World Congress on Pain... Having explained non-associative learning and Pavlovian conditioning, Prof Vlaeyen moved on to operant conditioning, a behavioural model of learning which Skinner proposed and … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 3: Learning Pain pt 1

Professor Johan Vlaeyen delivered his plenary lecture at the World Congress on Pain over video. The IASP promised to provide the recording on their website, but some of you had already asked for blog posts on the congress sessions, so I will provide a synopsis of Prof Vlaeyen’s lecture here. His talk was a helpful exploration of the roles that … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 1: Disentangling CRPS

Adios Buenos Aires, IASP World Congress is always such a big beast. Vast conference halls, so many possible sessions to attend, so many posters to view and in this case so many fantastic Argentinian steaks to eat and wash down with equally fantastic Malbec. But you often leave trying to make sense of what you have heard and what, if anything, … [Read more...]

Congresses and cash – the BiM flag flies high

A big congratulations to the Body in Mind research group, who flew a high flag at two recent congresses - The Low Back Pain Forum in Brazil, and the World Congress on Pain in Argentina. From James: The Low Back Pain Forum has always been a small and highly prestigious meeting (150 of the world’s expert back pain researchers) that can be a hard … [Read more...]

Elite athletes are human too

Putting the Sydney Swans dasher Gary Rohan through the ‘credible evidence of danger and safety’ test I have taken most of an article published in Melbourne’s The Age, and Sydney’s  Morning Herald, in the lead up to the Australian Football League’s Grand Final, where my team, the Sydney Swans, are taking on last year’s champions, the Hawthorn … [Read more...]

David Sackett Talks About Evidence Based Medicine

Another in our Golden Oldies series:  Here is a superstar, well I guess he is sort of a pioneer/superstar, of evidenced based medicine, in an interview with a slightly cheesy fellow, just after Sackett won the Gairdner Award for Leadership in Medicine. These awards are extremely posh and Prof Sackett deserves it. The thing I like about him is him … [Read more...]

Acupuncture and a cracking review paper

Going over the archives, Neil wrote this after finding a  review paper written by Professor Donald Marcus "Is Acupuncture for Pain a Placebo Treatment? An examination of the evidence".  First published in The Rheumatologist, it is open access - which means you can read the full paper for free. Acupuncture, some dodgy maths and a cracking review … [Read more...]

Making sense of research and helping it guide our practice

Another in our golden oldie series celebrating BiM's 5th birthday since it published it's first blog post on 17th August 2009.  This one by Neil O'Connell. A sparkling, glittery threat to evidence based practice Here at Brunel I run an MSc module on evidence based practice. In the first session of the module I run an honesty test. Here it is … [Read more...]