Cognitive Functional Therapy for chronic low back pain: The patients’ perspective

Pain and lack of function are the two main factors that motivate people with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP) to seek care [1]. When you ask a person with CLBP what treatments they have tried, the answer is often in the form of a shopping list: manual therapy, stabilising exercises, Pilates, yoga, medication, injections… and so might the … [Read more...]

The Strange Case of Interoception and Resilience or How to Become a Superhero

Steel is a very resilient material: it has the capacity to absorb the energy produced by a hit without breaking. Translating this original definition of resilience into the Psychology field, a person is resilient when they can cope well with stressful situations. No wonder Superman is called “man of steel”! Back to more scienc-y stuff, recently … [Read more...]

How well can clinicians predict the future?

“When will this be over?” “Will my back ever be good again?” When consulting for back pain the first thing on many patients’ minds is “How long will this last?” or “Will my back ever be as good as before?” In other words, they would like to know their prognosis [1]. However, it is actually not easy for clinicians to predict individual … [Read more...]

Put your money where your mouth is – introducing EPIC by Entropy

Many of you will know that at BiM, we have a policy of not promoting particular treatments or clinicians. This is because that is not in our remit. One thing that is well and truly in our remit however, is the advancement of better, and more science and evidence-based treatments by everyone. There are many ways we try to promote this advancement - … [Read more...]

Could telling right from left be a way forward in low back pain

Lately more and more research has indicated changes in cortical processing and disruptions of bodily representations in patients with low back pain (LBP). Among these findings, which have also been noted with other painful conditions, is impaired performance in laterality judgments [1,2]. While the exact relationship between LBP and laterality … [Read more...]

What’s best for chronic spinal back pain? Physical, behavioural/psychologically or combined interventions?

Non-specific chronic spinal pain (NSCSP), particularly low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP), results in significant personal, social and economic burden(here and here).[1,2] Our research group has recently published a systematic review and meta-analysis[3] in the Journal of Pain comparing the effectiveness of conservative interventions for … [Read more...]

Sex Differences in Knee Osteoarthritis: Not Just a Joint Issue

We have heard it countless times – Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus, a phrase (and dare I say, grossly overused one) coined by the author, John Gray, to denote the ubiquitous differences in communication and relationship styles existing between men and women. His book, by the same name, has certainly resonated with popular culture, evidenced … [Read more...]

I can feel your pain so clearly that it makes me trigger my defence mechanisms!

We are very pleased to be hosting Prof Serge Marchand for PainAdelaide 2016. His team recently published an interesting paper and we thought it was a great opportunity for us, and for all those coming to PainAdelaide or subscribing to PainAdelaide at your place (click here to buy a pass), to get a quick window into his work.   The mere … [Read more...]

Reflections on Pain Sensitivity

Pain sensitivity is thought to be a characteristic of each individual that affects the way a painful stimulus is perceived. In simple terms, being pain hyper- or hyposensitive results in the perception of the same stimulus as very painful or slightly painful, respectively. As a matter of fact, the same trauma results in extremely different amounts … [Read more...]

Tactile hyperalgesia: new central mechanisms?

Primary nociceptor activity is clearly not the only mechanism that can increase central sensitivity and pain. For example, certain cognitive and emotional states can also enhance pain and act centrally. A recent proposal has suggested that associative learning mechanisms such as classical conditioning, may also contribute to the clinical … [Read more...]