If only surgery wasn’t such a pain in the…. knee!!

Kristian_Petersen

Liz, a 65 year old retired nurse, was diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis (OA) several years ago. Her GP subsequently prescribed a range of non-surgical and pharmaceutical interventions to treat her knee pain with limited success. Recently, she was referred to an orthopedic surgeon to evaluate the need for a total knee replacement (TKR). While TKR … [Read more...]

Treating more than just the back in chronic low back pain

Aoife Synnott

'Physiotherapists may stigmatise or feel unprepared to treat people with low back pain and psychosocial factors that influence recovery: a systematic review' (Synnott et al, 2015) There is considerable evidence that when people have chronic low back pain (LBP), several factors can be involved in delaying their recovery and/or their ability to … [Read more...]

EP 15 years in: historical and theoretical underpinnings

Lorimer Moseley

This is my second post based on a perspectives piece David Butler and I wrote for the Journal of Pain. You can get the gist of it by just reading the bolded sentences. It is some time now since John Loeser adapted Engel’s biopsychosocial model to fit it to the lived experience of chronic pain. From my perspective as someone who had experience on … [Read more...]

Isometrics reduce tendon pain

Ebonie Kendra Rio

Anyone with tendon pain will tell you, it’s a pain in the butt (hamstring tendon pain that is). If it’s your Achilles tendon, the mornings are a struggle and you may have stopped walking, running or playing with your kids. For the athlete, pain relating to the Achilles, Patellar, Hamstring or Adductor tendons can strip away power and spring needed … [Read more...]

Brain Image Biomarkers for Pain: Why should we?

BodyInMind

Indulge me for a moment. Let’s say you just arrived at your physician’s office with a troubling symptom. She says “Hold on, I need to put you in the MRI to see if this symptom is pain, or if you are a pain patient.” There have been a number of scientific papers and popular press releases that suggest we need to replace self-report of pain … [Read more...]

15 years of Explaining Pain – where have we been and where are we going?

Lorimer Moseley

Neuroscience was clearly my favourite course at uni – I loved it so much I was learning for fun, not for exams. I don’t recall ever studying for a neuroscience exam – it all seemed to magically stick in there – as if there were tailored docking stations in my brain just waiting for their particular neuroscience nugget to lock in. I found it … [Read more...]

How does sensory and sympathetic nerve sprouting contribute to a chronic pain state in a nonhealed fracture?

Stephane Chartier

Our lab continues to be intrigued by the mechanisms that generate and drive skeletal pain. Painful skeletal conditions are highly prevalent and their impact is pervasive in both developing and developed countries (Lubeck, 2003;Woolf & Pfleger, 2003; Brooks, 2006; Kidd, 2006). The skeletal system is essential for structural support, movement, … [Read more...]

Sleep, pain and exercise

Helena Hachul

Sleep is an essential biological phenomenon, and sleep deprivation causes various physiologic and behavioral changes in the body. It has been shown that total sleep deprivation (Shuch-Hofer et al., 2013) or sleep deprivation of a specific stage of sleep (Roehrs et a., 2006; Azevedo et al., 2011) cause hyperalgesia (exaggerated sensitivity to pain). … [Read more...]

tDCS for clinical use. Let’s not throw the baby out with the bath water

Asbjørn Fagerlund

In my academically formative years, a psychology text book defined psychology as a scientific discipline that aims to describe, predict and change behavior. This definition stuck. Shortly afterwards, during my training as a clinical psychologist, I was introduced to tDCS by Dr. Per Aslaksen at the University of Tromsø. The method was appealing: a … [Read more...]

Sympathetic blocks for complex regional pain syndrome

Based largely on his clinical experience, the founding father of modern pain medicine, John J. Bonica, recommended that complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) be treated with a series of sympathetic blocks as soon as possible after symptoms develop. Although this sometimes seems to work well, the value of this approach has been questioned because of … [Read more...]