Is GDR effective in the treatment of chronic neck pain?

Satoshi Nobusako

It was in 2005 that I came up with the idea of a “gaze direction recognition" (GDR) task as a possible treatment for chronic neck pain. At that time some of the rehabilitation patients visiting my rehabilitation department had suffered from neck pain for a long time because of cervical strain or previous cervical spine surgery. In those days, such … [Read more...]

The role of Range of Motion in recovery from Whiplash Associated Disorders

Mark Williams Researcher

Summary My PhD research investigated the role of cervical spine Range of Motion in the recovery from Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD). This formed part of my work on a large RCT investigating conservative treatments for WAD [2]. In clinical practice, Health Care Professionals attach value to measurements of cervical spine Range of Motion … [Read more...]

The moral hazard of whiplash

A whole edition of Spine was recently dedicated to whiplash associated disorders (WAD) (Vol 36 Number 25S). One paper by Cote and Soklaridis (1) caught my attention. They warn that health professionals should be aware of the danger of iatrogenesis during the early stages of WAD. According to Wikipedia the term iatrogenesis means brought forth by a … [Read more...]

What happens when systematic reviews tell us different things?

Conventional wisdom tells us that when we want an answer to a clinical question, such as what is the evidence for treatment ‘X’, we should look to systematic reviews because they collate all the available evidence on that topic. Problematically though, sometimes systematic reviews on the same topic don’t all give us the same conclusions. This … [Read more...]

Teaching people about pain – a kind of position paper

Fig1_PhyTherRev_12_169

Some time ago, I wrote this paper, at the request of the journal Physical Therapy Reviews, on reconceptualising pain. It is a little old now but it has come to be a bit of a position paper. The position has four fundamentals, none of which will be very surprising to anyone I imagine: (i) pain does not provide a measure of the state of the … [Read more...]