Medical exercise therapy breaks the chronic pain cycle, even in the longer term, in patients with persistent anterior knee pain

Fig 2

In general there is a lack of long-term success in treating people with persistent musculoskeletal pain and long-term anterior knee pain or patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), is no exception [1].  It is reported that approximately 25% of patients with PFPS continue to have pain and dysfunction one year or more after physiotherapy, the most … [Read more...]

Can the internet help? Promising results from an online Pain Course

Blake Dear

Every day, around the world, clinicians and scientists are working hard to better understand and treat chronic pain. Important advances are being made every day. However, many people are left to live with chronic pain and to manage its impact on their day-to-day lives. For many people this can also lead to feelings of frustration, stress, anxiety, … [Read more...]

Teaching people about pain – why do we keep beating around the bush pt 2

Continued from previous post... All is not lost, however. There is an emerging body of literature that suggests that we can change the way people understand their pain. We can reconceptualize pain in a way that makes clear the distinction between tissue damage, nociception and pain. The bulk of the work in this area is guided by a model that … [Read more...]

Teaching people about pain – why do we keep beating around the bush

A frank approach to interpersonal communication brings with it some challenges, but having to dig oneself out of a hole, created by strategically avoiding the truth, is not one of them. This frank approach is well suited to science – the scientific process requires us to pursue and report the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. We do … [Read more...]

A Painful Yarn part two

Continued from Eric's A Painful Yarn part one......So, what did I notice? First, the adrenaline that accompanied the accident was wearing off. I could feel moment-by-moment discomfort and tension increasing in my right ankle and left knee as they swelled. I also got the sense that my body wanted movement. I found myself doing the proverbial … [Read more...]

A Painful Yarn part one

Eric Kruger

I was riding my bike on my normal route to work. Then it happened, like a blink. A jeep that was not supposed to be there was there, coming at me. No time to change course or apply brakes, just brace for impact.I was headed west bound on a two lane road. Entering a light controlled intersection on a green light.  A Jeep Cherokee in the opposing … [Read more...]

What about people who do function WITH chronic pain?

Remko Soer

Well, what about those? Most researchers would suggest there aren't many of them.  A quick review on PubMed will only give you a few useful hits, however it is estimated that about 70% of all people suffering from chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain manage to stay functioning at work. In actual fact this may in many cases be for the better, as … [Read more...]

Good news for chronic nerve pain sufferers…but it could have been better

This post is a republishing of a recent article in The Conversation by Michael Vagg:The announcement on Friday last week that pregabalin (Lyrica) made it onto the Pharmacutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) is a huge relief for sufferers of chronic nerve pain.It also means that the true cost of providing appropriate care to chronic pain sufferers … [Read more...]

The Opioid Bank. It seems we are facing another global crisis!

Opioids. We all know what they are and that there are a lot of them going around, but it wasn’t until I was asked to write this blog on the information overloading review by Manchikanti and friends (2010) that I realised quite the extent. And to tell you the truth, it’s painfully scary!In a nutshell, well over half of the review pumped out … [Read more...]

What can a patient’s pain tell us about contributing mechanisms?

contributing mechanisms to pain flow chart

Ever put down a copy of Explain Pain, or some other highly valuable text, and asked 'So how do I integrate all this stuff when I assess a patient and plan treatment?' You might have felt exasperated after reading yet another article on pain mechanisms, or central sensitisation, or cortical reorganisation, and said to yourself 'yes but how do I know … [Read more...]