Can the internet help? Promising results from an online Pain Course

Blake Dear

Every day, around the world, clinicians and scientists are working hard to better understand and treat chronic pain. Important advances are being made every day. However, many people are left to live with chronic pain and to manage its impact on their day-to-day lives. For many people this can also lead to feelings of frustration, stress, anxiety, … [Read more...]

Acupuncture once more. A debate in Anesthesia and Analgesia.

We’ve covered acupuncture  a lot on BiM and regular readers will be in little doubt about my interpretation of the evidence. The weight of acupuncture evidence is consistent with an inactive intervention. To my mind further research is pointless (heh). It represents, as we argued in The Conversation recently, an increasingly desperate exercise in … [Read more...]

Constraint-Induced Movement therapy for long-term walking impairment in multiple sclerosis

Victor Mark

Our research laboratory at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in the United States has tested a distinguished form of physical therapy for persons with chronic walking difficulty from multiple sclerosis. The therapy is called Constraint-Induced Movement therapy, or CI therapy for short.  The treatment was developed from years of basic … [Read more...]

Classification based cognitive functional therapy for back pain

This story of a 28 year old man with disabling low back pain illustrates the CB-CFT intervention trialled in the RCT in Bergen, Norway. ‘Eight years ago I had a lifting injury at work. It was terrible pain, I was worried so I went to the doctor who ordered a scan. The doctor said I had a back of a 70 year old. He said I couldn’t surf again and or … [Read more...]

Clean teeth, bad back? Antibiotics for chronic low back pain.

It is unsurprising that there are few-to-no impressively effective treatments for chronic non-specific low back pain. The clue is in the “diagnostic” label. Non-specific low back pain represents the vast majority of cases for whom our traditional diagnoses don’t explain a great deal. If we can’t put our finger on what is causing it, we are likely … [Read more...]

Is GDR effective in the treatment of chronic neck pain?

Satoshi Nobusako

It was in 2005 that I came up with the idea of a “gaze direction recognition" (GDR) task as a possible treatment for chronic neck pain. At that time some of the rehabilitation patients visiting my rehabilitation department had suffered from neck pain for a long time because of cervical strain or previous cervical spine surgery. In those days, such … [Read more...]

Self-management for low back pain

Vinicius Cunha Oliveira

I have had an interest in low back pain since the early stages of my career as a physiotherapist. My relatives, friends and patients complained about this condition and its recurrence even after receiving treatment. At that time, I was intent on finding a “cure” for this condition. I often browsed the literature to find the causes and possible … [Read more...]

Good news for chronic nerve pain sufferers…but it could have been better

This post is a republishing of a recent article in The Conversation by Michael Vagg: The announcement on Friday last week that pregabalin (Lyrica) made it onto the Pharmacutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) is a huge relief for sufferers of chronic nerve pain. It also means that the true cost of providing appropriate care to chronic pain sufferers … [Read more...]

Want to turbo-charge your rehab? Go to the movies!

Steve Schmidt PT

Jack Nicklaus is on the short list of the greatest golfers of all time, and I love his evocative quote, “before every shot, I go to the movies.” He never hits the ball (not even in practice) without first having a very sharp, focused picture of it in his head. He constructs a detailed image of the green, every dimple on the ball, the trajectory and … [Read more...]

Exercise is often ineffective as a short-term pain killer for patients with chronic pain

When healthy people start to exercise, the brain activates powerful descending analgesic systems (pain inhibitory actions). This leads to increased pain thresholds during exercise, making it less likely that we will feel pain during, or immediately following, exercise.  However, brain-orchestrated analgesia or pain inhibition is often impaired in … [Read more...]