Ebola and the viral spread of information

ebola-on-social-media-global-discussion-660x541

Ebola is increasingly in the news with much information - and misinformation - in the media. The following are extracts adapted from two blog posts by Symplur [1,2], who are not only following the spread of information about this disease, but also looking at whether organisations and people who know much about Ebola are able to influence this … [Read more...]

Dr Andrew Moore on Evidence and Pain

The second of three keynote speaker interviews by Australian Pain Society at their annual conference: Dr Andrew Moore on evidence and pain and the effectiveness of certain types of drugs. Dr Andrew Moore is Director of Pain Research, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, and Chairman of the International Association for the … [Read more...]

The Gruffalo’s Trial and some blatant advertising

The following blog is an adapted editorial that I published earlier this year in the journal – Pain and Rehabilitation: The Journal of the Physiotherapy Pain Association (PPA). The journal has been on the go for over 20 years and was started by the late Louis Gifford who was a founder member of the PPA. I am currently the Editor-in-chief of this … [Read more...]

PhD researchers of the world, unite and take over!

Pain science in motion

PhD researchers often have a struggle to get their work (in progress) onto the stage of an international congress. Indeed, places on stage of the large international pain congresses are limited, and they are traditionally allocated to the leaders in the field.  The first colloquium in the world to focus on PhD researchers in the field of pain … [Read more...]

Do brain changes really contribute to persistent low back pain?

If you’ve recently attended a pain conference, had a glass of wine with a pain boffin or spent time googling ‘pain’ you’ve no doubt come across the terms ‘neuroplasticity’ and ‘central sensitization’. These buzzwords are increasingly used to describe biological changes that might contribute to persistent low back pain. But do they really explain … [Read more...]

Could pain science be becoming fashionable? WCPT announces successful symposia.

The World Congress on Physical Therapy, which will be held in Singapore next May, has just announced the successful proposals for symposia. There were, apparently, a very large number of submissions. However, an intriguing thing has happened - 20% of symposiums are focussed on pain. At first glance, one might think - only 20%? However, if that is … [Read more...]

Time to get qualified in Pain Science?

University of Sydney

Information and new findings about pain bombard us from all directions and keeping abreast of them is a major challenge. Another challenge is integrating this knowledge for clinical applications. While there are discipline-specific issues associated with pain and its management, we need to know about the broad field of pain if we are to work … [Read more...]

Have your say! What Refresher Course would you want at the World Congress on Pain?

I am on the Scientific Programme Committee for the next World Congress on Pain, to be held in Buenos Aires in October 2014. I am also on the subcommittee that is organising the range of refresher courses. Refresher courses are 3 hour sessions aimed at bringing attendants up to speed in a certain area. Here is your chance to influence how the World … [Read more...]

Teaching people about pain – why do we keep beating around the bush pt 2

Continued from previous post ... All is not lost, however. There is an emerging body of literature that suggests that we can change the way people understand their pain. We can reconceptualize pain in a way that makes clear the distinction between tissue damage, nociception and pain. The bulk of the work in this area is guided by a model that … [Read more...]

Teaching people about pain – why do we keep beating around the bush

A frank approach to interpersonal communication brings with it some challenges, but having to dig oneself out of a hole, created by strategically avoiding the truth, is not one of them. This frank approach is well suited to science – the scientific process requires us to pursue and report the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. We do … [Read more...]