Dr Andrew Moore on Evidence and Pain

The second of three keynote speaker interviews by Australian Pain Society at their annual conference: Dr Andrew Moore on evidence and pain and the effectiveness of certain types of drugs. Dr Andrew Moore is Director of Pain Research, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, and Chairman of the International Association for the … [Read more...]

Jeff Mogil on the nature and nurture of pain

The Australian Pain Society recently held their annual conference (and what a conference it was) and interviewed their keynote speakers.  This is the first of three - Prof Jeff Mogil on the nature and nurture of pain. Professor Jeffrey Mogil is currently the E.P. Taylor Professor of Pain Studies and the Canada Research Chair in the Genetics of … [Read more...]

The Gruffalo’s Trial and some blatant advertising

The following blog is an adapted editorial that I published earlier this year in the journal – Pain and Rehabilitation: The Journal of the Physiotherapy Pain Association (PPA). The journal has been on the go for over 20 years and was started by the late Louis Gifford who was a founder member of the PPA. I am currently the Editor-in-chief of this … [Read more...]

Can low back pain be influenced by pain in the front of the body?

John Panagopoulos

As a physio who works in a busy clinic and treats lots of different people, one of the phenomena that I’ve observed over the years is how many patients, who present with back or neck pain, and also mention they have lots of gut / reproductive problems. These gut problems are generally mild symptoms like feeling bloated and constipated. Even when … [Read more...]

New light on bone formation in CRPS?

Roberto_Perez

The variability of signs and symptoms of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), may represent between-patient variability in the pathological mechanisms at work. One often forgotten CRPS feature is impaired bone formation yet this has been found in up to fifty percent of patients regardless of disease duration [1]. German Surgeon Paul Sudeck … [Read more...]

Sense of ownership is necessary to anticipate pain

The awareness of being the owner of one’s body is probably the most common basic experience in life and is rarely considered as a cognitive function – just like speech or memory. This sense of ownership can be disrupted by brain injury, leading to a striking neuropsychological condition called somatoparaphrenia, defined as the acquired delusion … [Read more...]

Which treatments for which patients?

Adam Hirsh

How do clinicians decide which treatments to provide to which patients? One might assume a simple process: if patient X has condition Y, treatment Z is provided. For many conditions, it is this straightforward – treatment guidelines are clear enough to remove any guesswork. Unfortunately, clear guidelines do not exist for chronic pain. Even the … [Read more...]

Mindful Teens Cope Better With Pain

Mark Petter

Mindfulness refers to purposefully paying attention to moment-to-moment experiences in a nonjudgmental and accepting manner [1]. Although mindfulness has its roots in Buddhist traditions, there is nothing inherently religious or esoteric about the concept. In fact, all people are more or less mindful in their day-to-day lives. For example, right … [Read more...]

Tactile acuity training meets back pain meets Frankie goes to Hollywood

Cormac Ryan

One of the most exciting areas of pain science at the moment is brain training. To me this is the idea that the patient’s brain image of the painful area does not match the physical body itself and this mismatch, for some reason, maintains the pain. Brain training interventions attempt to correct this mismatch by reshaping the brain image to … [Read more...]

Illusory self-identification with an avatar reduces arousal responses to painful stimuli

Daniele_Romano

Pain experience can be modulated at different levels of processing and is influenced by higher cognitive function like attention and expectations. It has been shown recently that looking at one’s own hand, but not at a neutral object or another person’s hand, induces analgesic effects while receiving acute painful stimulation (Longo, et al., … [Read more...]