Quantitative sensory tests: are they stable over time?

We use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore how somatosensory information is processed in the nervous system in people with painful conditions such as low back pain, fibromyalgia, and irritable bowel syndrome. QST has shown promise for clinical applications such as evaluating responses to interventions (Grosen, Fischer et al. 2013), … [Read more...]

How does watching a parent in pain impact children’s own pain experiences?

Pain problems tend to run in families; if you have a parent with chronic pain you are also more likely to experience chronic pain yourself 1. While a simple explanation for this phenomenon is that parents and children share genetics that may predispose them to pain, research has shown that this does not fully explain the relationship, and thus begs … [Read more...]

How feeling upset might increase pain after a bad night

Emotions, sleep and pain are interlinked; however, we understand little about how these aspects of our wellbeing are connected. Does a poor night’s sleep make us feel grumpy, which in turn makes our pain worse? Or does feeling sad in the first place make people less likely to recover from a poor night’s sleep and wake up with increased bodily pain? … [Read more...]

What about congenital insensitivity to pain?

We had a question recently from Mensah Y Amedzo who asked: Hi Lorimer, with regards to this statement “nociception is neither sufficient nor necessary for pain” how do you explain the fact that people with Congenital Insensitivity to Pain never experience pain even though other sensations are intact and they obviously have a brain. They don’t … [Read more...]

Pain and the sum of parts: nociceptive integration

The nociceptive system has evolved a range of intriguing characteristics. Spatial summation is one such characteristic, whereby increasing the area of a stimulus, or the distance between multiple stimuli, results in more intense pain—not only a greater area of pain. This befits pains’ protective function, because larger/multi-site injuries are … [Read more...]

What app is good for my back?

The rate of smartphone ownership in Australia is among the highest in the world. According to the Deloitte 2015 Consumer Survey, almost 80% of Australians own a smartphone. Online technologies, such as apps, can help us manage our health and they are influencing healthcare in new and exciting ways. There are currently over 259,000 health apps … [Read more...]

Your chance to actually change the world. You need 2.5 hours in August to do it

Dear BiM world - here is a chance to help out the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) AND, in the process, actually nudge the entire pain world. The IASP is currently working with the WHO on a system of classifying chronic pain as part of the ICD-11.  We would like to invite you to participate in the testing of the draft system. … [Read more...]

Exercise considerations for chronic musculoskeletal pain

Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) encompasses a diverse range of conditions such as osteoarthritis, discogenic spinal pain, fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain. There is consistent evidence for the benefit of exercise to improve pain and function in CMP, although there is considerable uncertainty concerning the best exercise modality and … [Read more...]

Assessment of movement control impairments of the neck

In a study on patients with and without neck pain we set out to evaluate a battery of ten movement control tests for the neck using a Rasch analysis (Sattelmayer, Hilfiker, Luomajoki, & Elsig, 2017). The aim was to establish whether all movement control tests measure the construct “movement control impairments of the neck”, to establish the … [Read more...]

Embodied Pain: negotiating action

We determine our world through the actions we take. Whether from the inside or out, our bodies provide us with the means to actively investigate our environment. This investigation is vital to survival. Active investigation enables us to reduce the uncertainty of the world, accommodate the unexpected, and better predict the consequences of our … [Read more...]