Persistent low back pain: Can screening predict risk?

Almost everyone will experience low back pain (LBP).  Most of us also know someone who has persistent LBP – pain that comes and goes, or never goes; that limits work, or life or enjoyment.  When our own back hurts we worry (a little or a lot) that we might end up like them. The majority of adults who suffer a new episode of LBP recover within a … [Read more...]

We need YOUR friends and family….

We are interested in how the information we receive about our back affects our decision to be active or not. We are doing an experiment on it. We need 400 people to take part but we need them to NOT be readers of Body in Mind!! So, could you please ask your friends, family, neighbours, relations, colleagues to help us out?  We would be very … [Read more...]

Can Quantitative Sensory Testing responses predict the course of low back pain?

We know low back pain (LBP) is a condition with a variable prognosis. A good proportion of people recover quite quickly from an episode of LBP, but some will have fluctuating symptoms or develop chronic LBP [2]. Currently, there is no consensus as to which factors are more important to predict this trajectory [3]. Psychosocial (e.g. distress) and … [Read more...]

Spreading Pain Education in Brazil

Development of the first internet-delivery pain education intervention in Brazil It is well established that pain, especially chronic pain, is a public health problem worldwide. Chronification of pain may be due to mismanagement of acute pain that can result in modifications in the peripheral and central nervous systems. Likewise, insufficient … [Read more...]

Making a definition of pain work for us

With our new proposal, we are not, emphatically NOT, suggesting that we have arrived at the ideal definition of pain. A definition needs to work for clinical and experimental pain, for humans and for other animals, for excruciating and for trivial pain. It needs to distinguish pain from all other sources of distress, from specific anxieties to … [Read more...]

Is alcohol effective as a painkiller?

How many people have sustained an injury (accidental or other) after a few too many drinks, to find that the pain only really kicks in after they have sobered up? Pain experienced the morning after our drunken exploits may lend weight to the established belief that alcohol provides an effective form of pain relief. Historically, alcohol was a … [Read more...]

Alcohol and pain in the population

There is a problem in observational epidemiology. If a disease has an association with a behaviour within the population, we cannot tell which of these is true: the behaviour causes the disease; the disease causes the behaviour; or a third factor causes both. The first instinct for the reader of an epidemiological study is often to infer that … [Read more...]

Oldies but Goodies – Isometrics reduce tendon pain

Over this holiday season we are posting the most popular articles from the last five years.  The fourth most read in our archive is on isometric tendon pain by Ebonie Rio. Isometrics reduce tendon pain Anyone with tendon pain will tell you, it’s a pain in the butt (hamstring tendon pain that is). If it’s your Achilles tendon, the mornings are a … [Read more...]

Vitamin C and Back Pain, Really?

Pain is not a big killer like cancer or infectious diseases. However, back pain tops the scales of disease burden: when comorbidity is considered with disability-adjusted life years (DALYs)*– then back pain wins in almost every country (see http://www.healthdata.org/gbd). Other musculoskeletal problems, including arthritis, also count among the … [Read more...]

The dynamic effect of pain on attention

Pain tends to grab our attention, making it difficult to concentrate on other tasks. This is generally a useful feature of pain – if we burn ourselves while cooking, it’s good that our attention switches away from the food and towards the pain so that we can adequately protect ourselves. However, if the pain doesn’t signal threat (e.g. a tension … [Read more...]