Common psychologies in back pain?

Numerous psychological factors are associated with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and disability. Clinically, it would appear that the psychological profiles of individuals with CLBP can be dominated by different psychological factors. For example, some people are significantly depressed while others might exhibit strong fear-avoidance beliefs. In … [Read more...]

Could telling right from left be a way forward in low back pain

Lately more and more research has indicated changes in cortical processing and disruptions of bodily representations in patients with low back pain (LBP). Among these findings, which have also been noted with other painful conditions, is impaired performance in laterality judgments [1,2]. While the exact relationship between LBP and laterality … [Read more...]

What’s best for chronic spinal back pain? Physical, behavioural/psychologically or combined interventions?

Non-specific chronic spinal pain (NSCSP), particularly low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP), results in significant personal, social and economic burden(here and here).[1,2] Our research group has recently published a systematic review and meta-analysis[3] in the Journal of Pain comparing the effectiveness of conservative interventions for … [Read more...]

Making decisions about activity when your back hurts

Participating in physical activity is an important part of recovering from low back pain. The fear-avoidance model is often used to explain the way in which people who have pain approach activity. This model proposes that when someone experiences pain they may either avoid movement and activity due to fear of further pain or injury, or they … [Read more...]

Pain may or may not inhibit (chronic low back) pain

In 2014 David Yarnitsky hypothesised that people may be characterised by profiles that vary from pro- to anti-nociceptive. Those with pro-nociceptive profiles would likely show a reduced capacity to enrol the body’s own pain inhibitory mechanisms, and heightened sensitivity to repetitive, painful stimuli. Those with anti-nociceptive profiles would … [Read more...]

Are symptoms of depression a risk factor for low back pain?

It is well known that both low back pain and depression are highly prevalent, costly, and disabling conditions. The prevalence of patients suffering with both is high. Clinicians often encounter these complex patients and face challenging decisions for their management. Our research group, led by Dr Paulo Ferreira from the Arthritis and … [Read more...]

Tweeting Back

Globally, around 3.2-billion people are connected to the Internet. Online technologies are now ever-present in daily life, and they are influencing healthcare in new and exciting ways. The World Health Organisation has defined this phenomenon as “eHealth” - the practice of medicine and public health supported by electronic processes and … [Read more...]

Mid-back pain after traffic collisions: can your expectations move that mountain?

 “I saw my doctor and he said to me that some people suffer, that whiplash can take up to 18 months. Well, now I can see that he was
 right.” Patient with chronic pain after a traffic collision (Williamson et al., 2015) Recovery expectations have been found to play an important role in the prognosis of neck pain after traffic injuries (Holm et … [Read more...]

Chronic low back pain – are we really measuring the treatment outcome patients want?

Traditionally health care professionals (HCP) assess and treat according to the biomedical model, where the practitioner takes the leading role with diagnosis and intervention. Treatment goals are set by the HCP and are set against standard biomedical measures1.  But are patients are interested in our goals? How many exercise programs set by the … [Read more...]

Surgical or non-surgical management for sciatica – what you need to know

Whilst low back pain (LBP) is the number one cause of disability worldwide, a small number of patients will suffer associated leg pain, generally due to a herniated intervertebral lumbar disc - commonly known as ’sciatica’. Responsible for less than five percent of all low-back presentations, lower limb pins and needles, tingling, numbness or … [Read more...]