Review of clinical utility of pain classification part 2

Niamh Moloney

Part 2: Evaluating mechanism-based classification algorithms for neuropathic pain in people with non-specific arm pain: How’d they do? Translating knowledge of pain mechanisms into clinical practice is challenging. In our study [6] we examined three recently published classifications for assessing pain [1, 2, 7] (see previous post on BiM for … [Read more...]

Review of clinical utility of pain classification part 1

Niamh Moloney

Part I Mechanisms-based classification of pain: the algorithms Understanding pain mechanisms is high on research agendas, but we’re still struggling translating this into practice. A number of frameworks have been published recently, which outline criteria for assessing dominant pain type in individual patients. These include: Guidelines on … [Read more...]

Is education reassuring?

Adrian Traeger Body In Mind

Acute low back pain is inherently worrying; often there is no clear cause, no effective treatment, and a widely variable time frame in which you can expect to recover. Happily for many, the prognosis is good - they can expect to be a lot better within a matter of weeks. Sadly, for the others, we know all too well where that road can lead. One of … [Read more...]

Physiotherapists assessment of patients psychosocial status: is it a case of moving from yellow flags to white flags?

Saravana Kumar

In Australia, approximately 70% of physiotherapists work as primary contact practitioners in the community in settings such as private practice, sports clinics, community health services (HWA 2014). In these settings, they contend with a range of patient problems, including musculoskeletal conditions. There is an increasing body of evidence which … [Read more...]

Relationship between tactile acuity, clinical symptoms and perceived body image in patients with chronic low back pain

Tomohiko Nishigami

Some chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients report an expanded perceived image of the low back using words like: “My back feels like it’s swollen”. Altered perceived body image is associated with chronic pain conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) (Moseley, 2005; Lewis and Schweinhardt, 2012) and phantom limb pain (Flor et al., … [Read more...]

When I feel your pain

Sophie Vandenbroucke

Imagine you are preparing food with your partner. Suddenly, you observe your better half accidently cutting his or her hand with a kitchen knife. You may feel uncomfortable and distressed. In fact, you might even respond as though your hand has been cut – by experiencing the pain that would be associated with that event. This phenomenon, referred … [Read more...]

The role of significant others in the management of persistent musculoskeletal pain

Serena McCluskey

It has long been acknowledged that persistent musculoskeletal pain can be influenced by environmental factors, with an important source being the interaction between the pain sufferer and their ‘significant other’ (spouse/partner/relative). It is proposed that significant others can reinforce an individual’s unhelpful pain cognitions, such as fear … [Read more...]

World congress comes to you 7: Yes we can (control chronic pain)

In reviewing the notes I took during the workshop “Beyond the ordinary: Innovative psychological and educational approaches to chronic pain treatment” (15th World Congress on Pain, Buenos Aires), one important message stands out: pain is an experience produced by our brain and, for this reason, we can control it. How? During this workshop three … [Read more...]

Classification of low back pain. Are we winning?

Martin Rabey

As clinicians we know that no two people with low back pain (LBP) are identical. However, if we looked at a large number of people with LBP, would we be able to see some patterns emerge? Or similarities that could allow us to group these people together based upon some characteristics of their presentations? The idea of classification systems for … [Read more...]

Talking your pain away…

Annett Schirmer

Like other important sensations, pain elicits automatic nonverbal expressions. The functional significance of these expressions has been recognised by Charles Darwin (Darwin, 1872), who dedicated an entire book to them. In this book, he acknowledged that nonverbal expressions serve as signals for interaction partners. However, he also argued that … [Read more...]