Search Results for: french

Pain neuroscience education: Effects on pain and disability in chronic low back pain

Pain neuroscience education (PNE) has changed our practice as clinicians, our knowledge and the way we interact with patients. But does it change short-term or long-term pain and disability in patients with persistent low back pain? Until recently, three systematic reviews had been undertaken to evaluate the effect of PNE in persistent non-specific … [Read more...]

The MultiDimensional Symptom Index: A New Tool for Rapid Phenotyping of People in Pain

I like to measure things. I mean, I really like to measure things. Not entirely sure where that comes from, possibly my love of The Count on Sesame Street during my younger days, or possibly stemming from my philosophical positions on the nature of knowledge and reality:  I believe that any exploration of natural events that includes a … [Read more...]

Back Pain Research Projects

If you are researcher and would like to list your study contact us here. International research study on the perspectives of people with chronic low back pain Where: Online Contact: Dr Bronwyn Thompson at Otago University More info: We would love to know more about your experiences. Your feedback will help us to know how to identify … [Read more...]

Importance of intact spatial representation for crossed hands analgesia

In recent years there has been growing interest in how pain and nociception are influenced by visual and proprioceptive inputs. Research has demonstrated that nociceptive inputs, like tactile inputs, are localized using two frames of reference (1). One is somatotopic and it is based on the somatotopic maps in primary somatosensory cortices (S1). … [Read more...]

Intense pain influences the cortical processing of visual stimuli projected onto the sensitized skin

Imagine that you are cooking, your food in the oven is ready and you want to take it out. Hunger makes you impatient and you put your bare hand into the oven, but you accidentally touch the hot surface. You get a painful burn. The area of the burn becomes and remains more sensitive for a while. If you were to touch or apply a sharp object on that … [Read more...]

Spinal manipulative therapy, Graston technique® and placebo for long standing non-specific mid back pain

Few controlled trials have assessed the efficacy of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) for mid back pain. In addition no high quality trials have been performed to test the efficacy and effectiveness of Graston Technique® (GT), an instrument-assisted soft tissue massage therapy. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of SMT and GT … [Read more...]

Mid-back pain after traffic collisions: can your expectations move that mountain?

 “I saw my doctor and he said to me that some people suffer, that whiplash can take up to 18 months. Well, now I can see that he was
 right.” Patient with chronic pain after a traffic collision (Williamson et al., 2015) Recovery expectations have been found to play an important role in the prognosis of neck pain after traffic injuries (Holm et … [Read more...]

Making sense of research and helping it guide our practice

Another in our golden oldie series celebrating BiM's 5th birthday since it published it's first blog post on 17th August 2009.  This one by Neil O'Connell. A sparkling, glittery threat to evidence based practice Here at Brunel I run an MSc module on evidence based practice. In the first session of the module I run an honesty test. Here it is … [Read more...]

Predictors of Suicidal Ideation in Chronic Pain Patients

This blog post relates to an article entitled Predictors of Suicidal Ideation in Chronic Pain Patients: An Exploratory Study that Dr. Manon Choinière, Dr. Warren Nielson and I have recently published in The Clinical Journal of Pain [4].  (To read this same blog post in French please click here). Suicide has always been a very sensitive topic to … [Read more...]

A sparkling, glittery threat to evidence based practice

Here at Brunel I run an MSc module on evidence based practice. In the first session of the module I run an honesty test. Here it is (answer it yourself and, well, be honest). “What sections of a research paper do you routinely read. Honestly.” Almost without exception the whole group will admit to reading the abstract and small proportion … [Read more...]