If only surgery wasn’t such a pain in the…. knee!!

Kristian_Petersen

Liz, a 65 year old retired nurse, was diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis (OA) several years ago. Her GP subsequently prescribed a range of non-surgical and pharmaceutical interventions to treat her knee pain with limited success. Recently, she was referred to an orthopedic surgeon to evaluate the need for a total knee replacement (TKR). While TKR … [Read more...]

The effectiveness of drugs for neuropathic pain – what do we know?

Neil O'Connell 2

Neuropathic pain (NP) - that is pain arising from identifiable damage or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system is common and frequently severe and life-changing. It is also notoriously difficult to treat effectively. Indeed we know that for many people with NP treatment is inadequate. The International Association for the Study of Pain … [Read more...]

Rethinking the role of the brain in driving phantom pain

Tamar Makin

Although pain is inherently linked to one’s own body, for people suffering from limb amputation, pain can be experienced as arising from outside the body – from their missing limb. This phenomenon, termed phantom limb pain, is estimated to occur in 4 out of 5 upper limb amputees, and therefore poses a significant medical problem. Phantom pain can … [Read more...]

Treating more than just the back in chronic low back pain

Aoife Synnott

'Physiotherapists may stigmatise or feel unprepared to treat people with low back pain and psychosocial factors that influence recovery: a systematic review' (Synnott et al, 2015) There is considerable evidence that when people have chronic low back pain (LBP), several factors can be involved in delaying their recovery and/or their ability to … [Read more...]

Specific autoantibodies in patients with longstanding CRPS

Andreas Goebel

We recently published a study on antibodies found in the blood of patients with longstanding Complex Regional Pain Syndrome [1]. Antibodies are substances produced by the body’s immune system. Their best-known role is to fight infection. However sometimes they go wrong, and bind to the body’s own cells, causing dysfunction or damage. These … [Read more...]

Painful view on motor actions

Jaakko Hotta

Imagine you sprained your wrist. It’s aching, swollen and reddish. You want to move the hand to see if it is ok, but the fear of pain makes you hesitate and it takes extra effort to do it. Even thinking about movement can be unpleasant and you focus on doing things with the healthy hand. After days and weeks, as the trauma heals, the pain passes … [Read more...]

tDCS – the bigger picture

photo_Kerstin

Last year I told you about a trial where we compared the brain’s activity during pain processing in the fMRI scanner before or after the application of an electrical brain stimulation technique (transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)). The result was that there wasn’t much change after tDCS, hence we raised doubts that tDCS had an effect on … [Read more...]

EP 15 years in: historical and theoretical underpinnings

Lorimer Moseley

This is my second post based on a perspectives piece David Butler and I wrote for the Journal of Pain. You can get the gist of it by just reading the bolded sentences. It is some time now since John Loeser adapted Engel’s biopsychosocial model to fit it to the lived experience of chronic pain. From my perspective as someone who had experience on … [Read more...]

Isometrics reduce tendon pain

Ebonie Kendra Rio

Anyone with tendon pain will tell you, it’s a pain in the butt (hamstring tendon pain that is). If it’s your Achilles tendon, the mornings are a struggle and you may have stopped walking, running or playing with your kids. For the athlete, pain relating to the Achilles, Patellar, Hamstring or Adductor tendons can strip away power and spring needed … [Read more...]

Brain Image Biomarkers for Pain: Why should we?

BodyInMind

Indulge me for a moment. Let’s say you just arrived at your physician’s office with a troubling symptom. She says “Hold on, I need to put you in the MRI to see if this symptom is pain, or if you are a pain patient.” There have been a number of scientific papers and popular press releases that suggest we need to replace self-report of pain … [Read more...]