Sympathetic nervous system indeed! … and why some people suffer over your pain

This is the sixth in a series of posts on BiM about chapters in the edited collection, Meanings of Pain (2016, Springer). -- Every day we are bombarded with expressions that borrow from the world of pain. Public spokespersons frequently allude to harmful implications of social, environmental or economic policies and events, such as the … [Read more...]

The lived experience of pain-related fear in people with low back pain

This post is the fifth in a series of posts on BiM about chapters in the edited collection, Meanings of Pain (2016, Springer). -- For many people low back pain (LBP) is scary. The spine is commonly perceived to be the structure linking our limbs to our trunk. It is also perceived to be the structure protecting the body’s ‘neural highway’ — the … [Read more...]

The moral experience of the person with chronic pain

This post is the fourth in a series of posts on BiM about chapters in the edited collection, Meanings of Pain (2016, Springer). -- What does the word ‘moral’ mean to you? These days it is often used to describe a person, or their actions, as being either ‘right’ or ‘wrong’. The ancient Greek thinker Aristotle had a different handle on it, … [Read more...]

Is an objective brain measure of pain possible?

This post is the third in a series of posts on BiM about chapters in the edited collection, Meanings of Pain (2016, Springer). -- On the surface, the pursuit of an objective measure of pain seems entirely sensible. After all, if I go and see my doctor and complain of feeling feverish he or she will inevitably take my temperature to obtain an … [Read more...]

Your chance to actually change the world. You need 2.5 hours in August to do it

Dear BiM world - here is a chance to help out the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) AND, in the process, actually nudge the entire pain world. The IASP is currently working with the WHO on a system of classifying chronic pain as part of the ICD-11.  We would like to invite you to participate in the testing of the draft system. … [Read more...]

N=1 as a reference for general concepts of experiencing pain

This post is the second in a series of posts on BiM about chapters in the edited collection, Meanings of Pain (2016, Springer). -- Should we allow our own experiences to guide our research? While ‘objectivity’ is being strived for in quantitative research, Rysewyk and Baeyer (2016) argue that researchers should focus more on their own … [Read more...]

A call to study the Meanings of Pain

This post is the first in a series of posts on BiM about chapters in the edited collection, Meanings of Pain (2016, Springer). We kick off the series with a question and answer session between Simon van Rysewyk, editor and contributor of Meanings of Pain, and Lorimer Moseley (LM), Editor-in-Chief of BiM. LM: Why make a call to study the Meanings … [Read more...]

Exercise considerations for chronic musculoskeletal pain

Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) encompasses a diverse range of conditions such as osteoarthritis, discogenic spinal pain, fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain. There is consistent evidence for the benefit of exercise to improve pain and function in CMP, although there is considerable uncertainty concerning the best exercise modality and … [Read more...]

Assessment of movement control impairments of the neck

In a study on patients with and without neck pain we set out to evaluate a battery of ten movement control tests for the neck using a Rasch analysis (Sattelmayer, Hilfiker, Luomajoki, & Elsig, 2017). The aim was to establish whether all movement control tests measure the construct “movement control impairments of the neck”, to establish the … [Read more...]

Embodied Pain: negotiating action

We determine our world through the actions we take. Whether from the inside or out, our bodies provide us with the means to actively investigate our environment. This investigation is vital to survival. Active investigation enables us to reduce the uncertainty of the world, accommodate the unexpected, and better predict the consequences of our … [Read more...]