On painful choices

Martien Schrooten1

People living with pain often find themselves in situations in which they have to choose between protecting themselves from pain and pursuing other plans or goals. For example, should I stay at home and rest to avoid worsening my pain or should I go to the office and impress my boss to get the promotion? Should I go to bed early so that I feel … [Read more...]

Join BiM to test a new treatment for chronic low back pain

We all know what a problem low back pain is, not only for people who have it but also for the provision of health care and for its impact on national economies. That is as true for developing nations as it is for Australia, the UK, the USA and other western countries. I have just returned from a physiotherapy conference in Nepal where although … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 6: Physical Activity and Chronic Pain

Sandy Hilton Physiotherapist

Physical Activity and Chronic Pain: From Cells to Systems and Beyond This workshop concentrated on the role of physical activity and exercise in the prevention and treatment of chronic pain, presented by Dr Sluka, Dr Bement and Dr Rovner. The audience was taken on a journey from basic science studies and predictive behavioral factors to … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 5: Innovative Approaches to Pain Education

Dr Eloise Carr (University of Calgary), Chair of the IASP Pain Education SIG coordinated the session “Innovative Approaches to Pain Education”. The goal of this session was to provide an update of the challenges and ongoing efforts of improving the consistency and accuracy of pain education in medical programs worldwide. Dr Carr, Dr Briggs, Dr … [Read more...]

World Congress on Pain comes to you. 2: Yoga, Mice, Pain and your Brain

Sarah Haag Yoga

The official title of the John J. Bonica Distinguished Lecture at the World Congress on Pain was actually ‘Effect of Environment on the Long-Term Consequences of Chronic Pain'. Prof Catherine Bushnell started her talk by noting comorbidities that any practicing clinician will have noticed at some point if treating people who are dealing with any … [Read more...]

What underlies fear for movement in people with low back pain?

Sam Bunzli

“I would never bend over to pick something up. I try to brace myself on any move. Because every time time it hurts I think that I’m doing more damage. Every time it hurts I think it is getting worse and I am breaking down, I am killing myself…” (John, a 42 year old school teacher who has experienced back pain for 2 years). “I don't think that … [Read more...]

Pain communication through body posture: The many postures of pain

Joe Walsh

Pain is not just a sensory experience. Of course, there is a key biological element to pain, but there is also a much broader range of factors that may influence how we perceive threatening events and noxious stimuli and may feed into the pain experience. An important factor that influences our pain perception is the social context in which we … [Read more...]

Pain and mortality in older adults, what is the relationship?

Rachael Docking

In those of working age there is a known association between pain and increased risk of mortality (excess mortality) for both men and women. Macfarlane et al (2001) found that adults with regional/widespread pain were at increased risk of mortality in the 8 years following onset, and these deaths were predominantly due to external causes (such as … [Read more...]

Can’t reduce your pain? Try a different way!

Hadas Nahman

Our nervous system has the capability to reduce pain by activation of specific pathways that exert inhibitory effects on the messages entering the central nervous system during or after threat or damage to the body. This is called endogenous analgesia. Several paradigms can be used to test its capacity and evaluate its efficiency. One paradigm, … [Read more...]

What does tDCS do for pain?

Arne May

We’ve heard a lot about non-invasive electrical brain stimulation recently (e.g. Body in Mind blog post tDCS – negotiating the 'rising tide' of hype), but does it really work for chronic pain? Well, some people who conducted trials in chronic pain populations claim it does [e.g. 1–5], but taking a closer look at the evidence is disappointing: the … [Read more...]