Flexibly Parenting Teens with Pain

Wallace, Dustin - UMKC portrait

Although a teenager with chronic pain might never admit it, research has shown that parents influence their pain and functioning even beyond annoying them (and thus “causing” pain). In fact, research shows that many things parents do, or even think, can impact their child’s pain. Unfortunately, most things are not always good or always bad! Pain … [Read more...]

Phantom limb pain: peripheral or central origin?

Martin Diers

In a recent paper by Vaso et al. (2014) it was suggested that phantom limb pain is driven primarily by activity generated within the ectopic dorsal root ganglia (DRG) (they wrote for BiM on it here). Ectopic activity is abnormal spontaneous activity generated in neuromas in the residual limb as well as in dorsal root ganglions. The authors reported … [Read more...]

Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for chronic low back pain

Steve Kamper

It is more or less well-accepted nowadays that back pain, particularly when chronic, is best understood within a biopsychosocial framework. The implication is that treatment is more likely to be successful if it includes components that target not only physical issues but also psychological and/or social factors. This is the premise that underpins … [Read more...]

Non-specific chronic back pain and hyperalgesia – A different story told by laser stimulation

Thomas Weiss

Despite our best scientific endeavors, what actually causes the pain in chronic low back pain (CLBP) often remains unclear. Approximately 85 % of chronic back pain patients are classified as having non-specific low back pain [1] because a definitive diagnosis cannot be given. That is, pain cannot be confidently attributed to known pathoanatomical, … [Read more...]

A novel alternative to conventional pain killers?

Christoph Stein

In a recent clinical study we showed for the first time that a large fraction (about one third) of pain relief produced by morphine (the gold standard among pain killers) is mediated by opioid receptors outside the brain. In patients undergoing knee replacement surgery, the blockade of such peripheral opioid receptors by methylnaltrexone (an opioid … [Read more...]

Gender and the body language of pain

Ed Keogh

It is now well established that men and women show general differences in how they report and experience pain - women tend to report more pain, with greater severity and frequency than men. Examples are numerous, and range from laboratory-based pain induction studies on healthy adults through to epidemiological and clinical investigations of … [Read more...]

Do psychological therapies improve outcomes for children with chronic pain?

Emma Fisher

It is common for adolescents and children to experience chronic pain (Perquin et al., 2000). There are many negative implications associated with chronic pain such as limited social contact, lost days from school, and higher levels of anxiety and depression (Hunfeld et al., 2002; Logan, Simons, Stein, & Chastain, 2008; Walker, Guite, Duke, … [Read more...]

Music modulation of pain perception

Christine Dobek

One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain -Bob Marley Playing music for pain relief isn’t exactly a new idea. Music has been used as a tool to promote physical and mental recovery for centuries, with the ancient Greeks initially describing music as a rational treatment strategy. Music is a highly desirable treatment tool for … [Read more...]

Can physical activity influence the course of low back pain?

Rafael Zambelli Pinto

It’s well known in the low back pain (LBP) field that conservative interventions have small to moderate effects at best.[1] Frustration with these small effects has prompted researchers to shift their attention to identifying prognostic factors. Prognostic factors are baseline factors that are associated with a worse or better disease outcome at a … [Read more...]

Capillary dysfunction in CRPS?

Leif ostergaard

Reports suggest that muscles lack oxygen and skin oxygenation is impaired in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). While CRPS might be related to tissue ischemia-reperfusion, the affected limb is often hyperperfused, suggesting that oxygen extraction is severely impaired instead. In a recent paper in Pain, we speculate that capillary flow … [Read more...]