BodyInMind

BodyInMind looks at the relationship between the body, the brain and the mind and how they interact particularly in chronic and complex pain disorders.

The phantoms in our dreams

Ask yourself for details in your latest dreams and you will recognize how hard it is to recall your own dream content in a precise and valid manner. In William Shakespeare’s world-renowned tragedy ‘Hamlet’, the protagonist says ‘a dream itself is but a shadow’, emphasizing the transience of this cognitive phenomenon. As such, dreams hardly lend … [Read more...]

Cognitive penetration: nowhere or everywhere? Either way you should probably wear protection

Over the past three decades there has been growing consensus that our experiences are not isolated forms that emerge unscathed from the influences of our beliefs, motivations and desires. Rather, they are penetrated by these cognitive or so-called ‘top-down’ effects to the point where the traditional boundaries between cognition and perception are … [Read more...]

Expressing pain: which patients do we trust?

Trustworthiness is one of those instant judgements we automatically make about other people, affecting our behaviour towards them [1]. We wanted to know whether clinicians’ judgements of patients’ trustworthiness affected their estimation of patients’ pain [2]. There seem to be so many grounds on which the complaint and expression of pain is met … [Read more...]

Chronic Pain: Can we reduce long-term painkillers use?

In our recent review in PAIN, the journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain, we presented a provocative perspective on introducing dose-extending placebos in therapeutic plans to boost patients’ outcomes while reducing use of painkillers (e.g, opioids).  This was based on our (and others’) studies showing that placebos produced … [Read more...]

Neural underpinnings of fear of movement in chronic low back pain – what do we know now?

Manual therapists such as physical therapists or chiropractors observe that some patients with seemingly identical back pain problems recover within weeks while others develop chronic pain and disability. What does research tell us about this phenomenon? Past research has identified and verified that one of the strongest links to the maintenance … [Read more...]

R.I.P. Prescriptive Clinical Prediction Rules

A lot of very good ideas have had a positive influence on clinical practice. Simple concepts such as washing one’s hands, restricting unnecessary care from those who don’t need it, and crowdsourcing in research have helped revolutionize clinical care and healthcare research. Some simple ideas, while well intended, fail to lead to a positive change … [Read more...]

Long-term elbow pain: is the brain more at fault than the tendon?

Tennis elbow (known in medical terms as lateral epicondylalgia) is a common condition that presents with pain on the outer aspect of the elbow. Despite its name, the condition is not restricted to tennis players and can affect anyone performing repetitive movements of the forearm (manual labourers, typists etc). In fact, tennis elbow affects up to … [Read more...]

Pain Management – it’s a sham

If we posit that pain is an output of the brain that is based on the perception of threat, it would follow that decreasing threat, whatever it may be, would positively influence a person’s pain experience. This has led to some exciting therapeutic advances aimed at altering threat, which include encouraging patients to rewrite their pain experience … [Read more...]

We should be worried about gravity?!?!

We all know how common back pain is and how back pain comprises a significant proportion of the 1 in 4 people with persistent pain. There is clearly an established link between the meaning of one’s pain and the fear it evokes, right?  Someone’s perception of what it happening in their back relates to their pain, right?  Castrophisation scales and … [Read more...]

Should proprioceptive training be a priority in the management of chronic pain?

Avid readers of BodyinMind.org know all too well that chronic pain can be associated with perceived distortions of the painful limb, be it in size, shape or posture [1-4]. In some cases, those with chronic pain report that they have limited awareness of the location of their painful body part [4, 5]. What they report may be a disturbance to the … [Read more...]