BodyInMind

BodyInMind looks at the relationship between the body, the brain and the mind and how they interact particularly in chronic and complex pain disorders.

Diagnostic uncertainty and pain-related guilt: new treatment targets for low back pain?

Low back pain (LBP) is a highly prevalent condition, with a devastating impact on society and it is now recognized as the leading cause of disability worldwide (Lim et al., 2012). Research suggests that several psychological factors play an important role in LBP, and among the most robust factors are depression, catastrophic cognitions, fear of … [Read more...]

Low Back Pain Treatment in Primary Care

In general, most acute low back pain (LBP) recovers spontaneously within a few days or weeks. No active treatment has shown to actually shorten the time it takes for acute back pain to recover. The purpose of medication, manipulation, acupuncture, physiotherapy etc. is at best to ease the pain while one is waiting for nature to heal. And one should … [Read more...]

The enduring bond between chronic back pain and sleep disturbance: not a love story

Intuitively, one expects that pain, whether acute or chronic, will affect sleep quality. However, the relationship between pain and sleep is not fully understood. Pain has been widely reported to be associated with various measures indicative of sleep disturbance including reduced sleep efficacy, reduced total sleep time, delayed sleep onset, … [Read more...]

Placebo responses and central neuropathic pain: from meta- to pooled analysis of clinical trial data

Defined as a reduction in pain without a biologically active therapeutic, the placebo response includes the placebo effect (i.e., psychobiological factors that cause a reduction in rating) in addition to other contributing factors, such as natural and expected fluctuations in pain [4]. To improve the design of future clinical trials, recent work … [Read more...]

Common psychologies in back pain?

Numerous psychological factors are associated with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and disability. Clinically, it would appear that the psychological profiles of individuals with CLBP can be dominated by different psychological factors. For example, some people are significantly depressed while others might exhibit strong fear-avoidance beliefs. In … [Read more...]

When is a Placebo Acceptable in the Clinic?

We recently published a paper with the mouthful title “Placebo Use in Pain Management:  A Mechanism-Based Educational Intervention Enhances Placebo Treatment Acceptability”[4].  Before I get to the the findings from that paper, I’d like to provide some context of where this paper fits in the larger placebo analgesia literature. Placebo is not … [Read more...]

Cognitive Functional Therapy for chronic low back pain: The patients’ perspective

Pain and lack of function are the two main factors that motivate people with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP) to seek care [1]. When you ask a person with CLBP what treatments they have tried, the answer is often in the form of a shopping list: manual therapy, stabilising exercises, Pilates, yoga, medication, injections… and so might the … [Read more...]

The Strange Case of Interoception and Resilience or How to Become a Superhero

Steel is a very resilient material: it has the capacity to absorb the energy produced by a hit without breaking. Translating this original definition of resilience into the Psychology field, a person is resilient when they can cope well with stressful situations. No wonder Superman is called “man of steel”! Back to more scienc-y stuff, recently … [Read more...]

How well can clinicians predict the future?

“When will this be over?” “Will my back ever be good again?” When consulting for back pain the first thing on many patients’ minds is “How long will this last?” or “Will my back ever be as good as before?” In other words, they would like to know their prognosis [1]. However, it is actually not easy for clinicians to predict individual … [Read more...]

Put your money where your mouth is – introducing EPIC by Entropy

Many of you will know that at BiM, we have a policy of not promoting particular treatments or clinicians. This is because that is not in our remit. One thing that is well and truly in our remit however, is the advancement of better, and more science and evidence-based treatments by everyone. There are many ways we try to promote this advancement - … [Read more...]