The role of sleep impairments on pain severity in adults with sickle cell disease

Gyasi Moscou-Jackson,

Sleep is a complex process and impairments can occur at different stages of the process. Sleep impairments may include decreased total sleep time (sleep duration), an increase in the amount of time it takes to fall asleep (sleep onset latency), or an increase in the amount of wakefulness after sleep onset (sleep fragmentation) experienced by an … [Read more...]

Review of clinical utility of pain classification part 2

Niamh Moloney

Part 2: Evaluating mechanism-based classification algorithms for neuropathic pain in people with non-specific arm pain: How’d they do? Translating knowledge of pain mechanisms into clinical practice is challenging. In our study [6] we examined three recently published classifications for assessing pain [1, 2, 7] (see previous post on BiM for … [Read more...]

Review of clinical utility of pain classification part 1

Niamh Moloney

Part I Mechanisms-based classification of pain: the algorithms Understanding pain mechanisms is high on research agendas, but we’re still struggling translating this into practice. A number of frameworks have been published recently, which outline criteria for assessing dominant pain type in individual patients. These include: Guidelines on … [Read more...]

Sympathetic blocks for complex regional pain syndrome

Based largely on his clinical experience, the founding father of modern pain medicine, John J. Bonica, recommended that complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) be treated with a series of sympathetic blocks as soon as possible after symptoms develop. Although this sometimes seems to work well, the value of this approach has been questioned because of … [Read more...]

Predicting persistent pain after shoulder surgery

Steven George

The goal of our study published in PAIN (January 2015) was to identify risk subgroups for predicting post-operative pain outcomes following shoulder arthroscopy. Our subgroups were made up of genetic and psychological factors believed to be players in the transition from acute to chronic pain conditions. We used a parallel cohort design and the … [Read more...]

Which treatments are people with osteoarthritis actually using?

Kim Bennell

It has been well established that hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the major causes of disease burden worldwide. There is currently no cure and joint replacement is typically reserved for advanced disease, whilst arthroscopy has been shown to have little or no benefit. For over 10 years now there has been substantial evidence supporting … [Read more...]

Capturing and sharing the voice and experiences of those who are living with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Karen Rodham

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is difficult to diagnose and is characterised by burning pain in one or more limbs, with 15-20% of patients developing long term disability [1]. The cause is unknown and there is currently no cure. As a consequence, people living with CRPS often turn to the Internet to seek CRPS-related information and support … [Read more...]

Is education reassuring?

Adrian Traeger Body In Mind

Acute low back pain is inherently worrying; often there is no clear cause, no effective treatment, and a widely variable time frame in which you can expect to recover. Happily for many, the prognosis is good - they can expect to be a lot better within a matter of weeks. Sadly, for the others, we know all too well where that road can lead. One of … [Read more...]

Physiotherapists assessment of patients psychosocial status: is it a case of moving from yellow flags to white flags?

Saravana Kumar

In Australia, approximately 70% of physiotherapists work as primary contact practitioners in the community in settings such as private practice, sports clinics, community health services (HWA 2014). In these settings, they contend with a range of patient problems, including musculoskeletal conditions. There is an increasing body of evidence which … [Read more...]

Relationship between tactile acuity, clinical symptoms and perceived body image in patients with chronic low back pain

Tomohiko Nishigami

Some chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients report an expanded perceived image of the low back using words like: “My back feels like it’s swollen”. Altered perceived body image is associated with chronic pain conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) (Moseley, 2005; Lewis and Schweinhardt, 2012) and phantom limb pain (Flor et al., … [Read more...]