Oldies but Goodies – Everything you wanted to know about CENTRAL SENSITISATION

Over this holiday season we are posting the most read articles from the last five years.  The third is a BiM review of a J Pain paper by Alban Latremoliere and Clifford J. Woolf (AKA L&W) Everything you wanted to know about CENTRAL SENSITISATION By Kerwin Talbot & Lorimer Moseley Another of our series on the Journal of Pain’s most … [Read more...]

Oldies but Goodies – The trigger point strikes … out!

Over this holiday season we are posting the most read articles from the last five years.  Here is the second. The trigger point strikes … out! John Quintner and colleagues recently published a controversial review in Rheumatology. We asked him to present their position in blog form. I expect it to stir some intriguing emotions in many of you and … [Read more...]

Oldies but Goodies – What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome – in plain English

Over this holiday season we are posting the most read articles from the last five years.  Here is the first. What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome – in plain English What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome? Well, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is exactly that Complex: Many, many different problems have been identified in people with … [Read more...]

Vitamin C and Back Pain, Really?

Pain is not a big killer like cancer or infectious diseases. However, back pain tops the scales of disease burden: when comorbidity is considered with disability-adjusted life years (DALYs)*– then back pain wins in almost every country (see http://www.healthdata.org/gbd). Other musculoskeletal problems, including arthritis, also count among the … [Read more...]

The dynamic effect of pain on attention

Pain tends to grab our attention, making it difficult to concentrate on other tasks. This is generally a useful feature of pain – if we burn ourselves while cooking, it’s good that our attention switches away from the food and towards the pain so that we can adequately protect ourselves. However, if the pain doesn’t signal threat (e.g. a tension … [Read more...]

Do depressed people experience more physical pain – or less?

Recent global burden of disease surveys tell us that pain and depression are two of the most common and pervasive issues in modern society. The fact that these two are also highly comorbid hardly generates surprise. Living with chronic pain often means restricted mobility, reduced capacity to work and general impairment of quality of life, in … [Read more...]

Quantitative Sensory Testing in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

Introduction Our recent review, published in “Pain Medicine”, highlighted the measurement properties of quantitative sensory testing (QST) and its clinical utility. QST results have been shown to be related to pain or neural sensitivity. QST has been put forward as a potentially useful tool for monitoring disease prognosis and evaluating … [Read more...]

Low-grade inflammation and the brain

What is inflammation? We usually talk about “inflammation” in relation to infections and injuries. When the body is infected, the immune cells recognize the ‘non-self’ molecules and produce inflammatory factors, called “cytokines”, to coordinate the fight against the infection. Cytokines signal other immune cells and bring them to the site of … [Read more...]

Optimizing the impact of research in chronic pain

Evidenced-based medicine integrates clinical experience with the results of the best available clinical research data to inform treatment decisions. Optimal application of evidenced-based medicine requires 2 things. First, the results of clinical research must be reported in the peer-reviewed literature in a clear, concise, and transparent manner … [Read more...]

“Encontros Saúde & Dor” Bringing Pain Education to Low-Income Communities in Brazil

Approximately 11.25 million Brazilians live in low-income communities or “favelas.” In my home town of Jundiaí, near São Paulo, there are no less than 14 of these low-income communities, the largest of which houses approximately 15 000 families. Some low-income communities, such as Rocinha in Rio de Janeiro, are home to up to 180 000 people. At … [Read more...]